Recent news stories have drawn attention to a possible link between diet and a particular form of heart disease. Learn about the possible connection between diet and this condition known as Dilated Cardiomyopathy. What can you do to help your dog now that we are seeing more golden retrievers with this problem? See the blog post here: Dilated cardiomyopathy and diet link

 

I want to introduce myself as the new Medical Coordinator for SEVA-GRREAT. This is a new position for the organization, and I am absolutely thrilled to be serving in this role. In this capacity, I oversee the health and medical needs and services for the dogs in our care and work very closely with the other members of the team to ensure our dogs get the best we can provide for them.  This involves not only management of the dogs needs but support for the foster families who are a critical part of our work. We couldn't do it without you!

A little info about me:

My name is Beth Rodgers and I have been a registered nurse for a long time and a dedicated lover of golden retrievers for even longer. I am a university professor, administrator, and researcher with a special emphasis on chronic illness and helping people live the best lives they can.  Early in my career I worked in intensive care settings, but over time realized I really wanted to try to keep people out of ICU rather than work with them once there. My clinical work and research, along with my own personal interests, incorporate a broad perspective of health and wellness. This emphasis translates very well to our golden retrievers who, as we know, are prone to a number of health challenges but who also deserve the opportunity to live the best life they can.

I fell in love with my first golden when I was about 8 years old and have had the pleasure of sharing my life with 5 now.  I have done obedience competitions and therapy work with my goldens and, sadly, have a lot of experience with their health issues, too.  Mostly, I just cherish that incredible golden spirit.  My idea of fun is sharing new experiences with my dog and watching him continue to bloom (he is a rescue who came with a lot of baggage) and, of course, reading research about veterinary issues. 

It takes a dedicated team to help a golden in need, and SEVA-GRREAT has an absolutely amazing group of volunteers who make GRREAT things happen for our goldens.  I am honored to work with this incredible group of people to assist in managing the health needs of the dogs in our care. 

Follow the health related information here, or you can find the same information in blog format where you can subscribe and follow as new posts are released. 

 

 

 

It makes sense to have one of the first entries focused on safety. Safety provides the foundation for everything else we do to help our golden retrievers live long, healthy, and happy lives. There are lots of areas in which safety should be a concern: playing, going for a walk, play dates with other dogs, riding in the car. A safe environment free of dangerous things your dog might ingest, however, is crucial in the world of golden retrievers. I'll never forget taking one of my golden retrievers to a local emergency room when she developed a very large swelling on her nose subsequent to a wasp sting. Fearing a more exaggerated allergic reaction, and of course it was a Saturday night, I wanted to make sure things did not get worse and cause some real problems for her. So, off we went to the vet ER. Upon walking in the door, we were greeted with a chorus from the staff, all saying in unison." and what did yours eat tonight? The waiting room had no fewer than 4 golden retrievers in it, all of whom had ingested something they shouldn't have.